ALDI shoppers are furious at the budget chain for reducing the size of baby wipes and increasing the price. 

The wipes have shrunk from a 64-pack to 60 wipes and increased in price from 55p to 62p a pack. 

Parents are also angry at Aldi for changing the wipes as they claim they are no longer up to the task of cleaning dirty bottoms. 

The supermarket's Mamia baby wipes have gone plastic-free to help the environment.

Thousands of furious parents responded to one mum's complaint on Facebook after she shared a picture of the different products, which now contain four fewer wipes.

She said: "Aldi are getting sneaky! 64 down to 60! Aldi sort it out!"

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Aldi's new plastic-free baby wipes come in a pack of 60 and are priced at 62p.

They have replaced its 64-pack of baby wipes which contained plastic, and the same size pack of biodegradable ones, both of which were priced at 55p.

As well as the 7p price hike, other parents agree the moist tissues are no longer up to the task.

One customer complained: "The wipes are now dryer, thinner and a funny texture therefore making it hard to use on dirty little bums. Very disappointed."

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Another said: "Please go back to the original baby wipes if I have to scrape baby poop from under my nails one more time I may cry."

Some even said they now have to use MORE of the tissues because they were not as good as the previous version.

Responding to complaints on Twitter the discounter said: "We’ve worked hard to keep our wipes as soft and effective as previously, but if you have noticed a difference, it may be because we have removed the plastic fibres and replaced them with plant derived fibres."

The change to the ingredients was first announced at the start of March, when the supermarket pledged to go plastic-free with its own brand wipes by summer.

An Aldi spokesperson said: "Moving to biodegradable wipes is another step forward in our commitment to reduce plastic across our ranges.

"As well as being plastic-free, our Mamia biodegradable wipes remain significantly cheaper than the Big Four, and we will continue to do all we can to keep prices down so shoppers know they will always make significant savings when they shop with us."

Rival retailer Tesco announced a similar move, saying it will stop selling branded baby wipes containing plastic in a pledge to help the environment.

It's the biggest seller of baby wipes in the UK and made it's own brand wipes plastic free two years ago.

Waitrose and Sainsbury’s previously told The Sun their own wipes are 100% plastic-free.

Morrisons said that all of their wet wipes will be made using a plant-based viscose by June 2022.

The government last year indicated that it could ban wet wipes altogether to stop them harming the planet and blocking toilets, 

Aldi's bargain baby range under the Mamia name includes everything from nappies to high chairs.

The range is often highly rated among mums and dads thanks the quality and price.

In another effort to help the environment, Aldi became the first supermarket to stop selling disposable BBQs this summer.

Meanwhile baby wipes are not the only items to shrink in size.

The Sun has identified several food and drink items that are now smaller in size – but you won't get them any cheaper.

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Corona Extra beer and Nescafe Gold Cappuccino are among the items suffering shrinkflation, as supermarkets and food manufacturers try to avoid putting up prices.

It comes as millions of Brits face a cost of living crisis, including rocketing bills for energy and council tax.

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