M&S joins the hard seltzer trend! Retailer delights fans with own brand range of low-calorie alcoholic sparkling water that’s taken the US by storm

  • Marks & Spencer has delighted fans by launching own brand of hard seltzers 
  • Cans of alcoholic sparkling water cost £1.80 and are all less than 75 calories
  • Comes after White Claw launching in the UK with dozens of brands joining the trend popular with health conscious millennials

Marks & Spencer has delighted fans by launching their own brand of hard seltzers.

Famed for their canned cocktail range, affectionately known as ‘tinnies’,  the upmarket British retailer has launched three flavours of alcoholic sparkling water, which has taken the US by storm in recent years.       

Last summer, famed brand White Claw, who account for more than half of hard seltzer sales in the US, launched in the UK, with dozens of independent and well-established brands following in their footsteps.

Marks & Spencer has delighted fans by launching their own brand of hard seltzers. Famed for their canned cocktail range, affectionately known as ‘tinnies’, the upmarket British retailer has launched three flavours of alcoholic sparkling water, which has taken the US by storm in recent years.

Now, Marks & Spencer has joined the trend in time for summer, with the launch of Black Cherry, Lemon and Lime and Raspberry and Rhubarb, flavours all for £1.80 and 75 calories or less.

Popular with health conscious millennial, Hard Seltzers became a sensation with American drinkers in summer 2019, so much so that there were shortages in stores, rationing was introduced, and a festival was launched in its name.

Since White Claw has launched  in Tesco, Sainsbury’s and Morrisons. 

Other brands, including Bud Light, Long Shot and Kopparberg have launched versions but White Claw certainly stood out, with  ‘clawing’ becoming slang with young drinkers who consumed the beverage in troves.  

The Atlantic, described 2019 as ‘The Summer of White Claw’ wither sales of the drink surging 300 per cent in a year. 

A festival called  Seltzer Land was set to debut in Minneapolis in April and travel to  Chicago, New York, and six more cities – but it was postponed amid the coronavirus pandemic.

And the trend has travelled across the pond to the UK, with Sainsbury’s ready-to-drink sales are up 80 per cent week on week at the end of March, with many revellers grabbing a hard seltzers while the sun was out. 

Other brands, such as Berczy, which launched in November, and promises 100 per cent natural, no added sugar alcoholic sparkling waters in three delicious fruity with hipster flavours including Passionfruit & Turmeric. 

Now, Marks & Spencer has joined the trend in time for summer, with the launch of Black Cherry, Lemon and Lime and Raspberry and Rhubarb, flavours all for £1.80 and 75 calories or less.

Meanwhile, Swedish cider brand  Kopparberg have three fruit flavour Hard Seltzers, while Funkin Cocktails have their own range and Love Island star Charlie Brake also launched his own brand ‘Naughty Water’ earlier this year. 

All brands are low carb and low calorie, and usually gluten-free and vegan.

Many see it as a healthy way to drink. SENTZ, which launched earlier this year, features added minerals – calcium, magnesium and potassium – and at just 92 calories per can (330ml) with a 4% ABV alcoholic kick.     

White Claw – who account for more than half of hard seltzer sales in the US – was the first Hard Seltzer to launch in the UK, with shoppers able to get their hands on the beverage in Tesco, Sainsbury’s and Morrisons.

It comes as non-alcoholic options will continue to grow, as Gen Z and younger millenials opt for more conscious dirnking.

Kricket’s Head of Beverage Will Rogers told FEMAIL last year: ‘Brought over from the US, these low-calorie spiked sodas are hitting the supermarket shelves with full force’.   

In December, Bibendum Wine, which supplies alcohol to bars and restaurants across the UK, told FEMAIL hard seltzers and other low calorie drinks will take the UK market by storm this year.

The retailer monitors the spending habits at restaurants and bars across the country to pick out trends at the early stages and predict what might be the next big thing. 

Source: Read Full Article