Beyonce rides shotgun in a convertible vintage Mercedes Benz – The Sun

BEYONCE was spotted riding shotgun in a convertible vintage Mercedes Benz.

The singer, 38, donned a mask, sunglasses and a hair wrap as she rode in the passenger side of the car.

While Beyonce rode along in the vintage vehicle, her bodyguards were driving their usual black Escalade behind.

In one photo she's seen speaking animatedly with a mystery person, then in the other she's adjusting her face mask – which has an upside down B on it.

The superstar appears to be ignoring the backlash against Lana Del Rey after she "compared herself" to pop stars Beyonce, Doja Cat and Nicki Minaj in a furious Instagram post earlier in the week.

The 34-year-old singer was slammed for being “racially insensitive” after she criticized "a group of mostly black women” in her controversial comments.




While talking about her upcoming album, she shaded her music colleagues – which also included Cardi B, Kehlani, Camila Cabello and Ariana Grande, for ”wearing no clothes.”

In the post Lana titled a “question for the culture,” she also said she was “fed up with female writers.”

Fans were livid about her comments which consisted of almost all women of color.

“I don’t know who was giving Lana Del Rey a hard time but I’m pretty sure it wasn’t Black women. Girl, sing your little cocaine carols and leave us alone,” one Twitter user wrote.


Another fired off: “Think Lana’s post would have been fine if she hadn’t compared herself to a group of mostly black women with the clear tone that she thinks she’s been treated worse by the media when that’s observably untrue.”

After the wave of criticism hit, Lana broke her silence Thursday and doubled down on her original comments.

"Bro. This is sad to make it about a WOC issue when I’m talking about my favorite singers. I could’ve literally said anyone but I picked my favorite f**king people.

"And this is the problem with society today, not everything is about whatever you want it to be. It’s exactly the point of my post – there are certain women that culture doesn’t want to have a voice it may not have to do with race I don’t know what it has to do with.

"I don’t care anymore but don’t ever ever ever ever bro- call me racist because that is bulls**t," she sounded off.

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Coronavirus has Con Edison bracing for expensive NYC summer

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New Yorkers will likely have higher electric bills this summer as more residents work from home and remain sheltered in place due to the coronavirus pandemic, Consolidated Edison Inc. said in a Wednesday press release.

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Under normal circumstances, a residential home in New York City typically uses 350 kilowatt-hours per month and has an electric bill of $99.14, according to company data from 2019. Con Edison expects that number to jump 9.5 percent to $108.53 per month between June and September.

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For New York City businesses that use 10,800-kilowatt-hours (with a peak demand of 31 kilowatts), Con Edison said these customers can expect their average monthly summer bill to increase from $2,203.94 in 2019 to $2,320.15 this year.

GAS TO REMAIN CHEAP DURING CORONAVIRUS AS DEMAND REBOUNDS: US ENERGY SECRETARY

Ticker Security Last Change Change %
ED CONSOLIDATED EDISON 70.74 -0.14 -0.20%

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Besides the fact that residents and businesses will be likely to blast air conditioners while they remain indoors, Con Edison said this summer’s higher-than-normal bills stem from rising costs put forth by power suppliers. Forecasts are showing this summer will be hotter than in previous years.

Despite Con Edison’s predictions, the company has suspended disconnecting power for customers who can’t pay their bills and is even going as far as waiving late fees for coronavirus-related unemployment.

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“Safe, reliable power is essential for New Yorkers, particularly during the health crisis,” said Tim Cawley, the president of Con Edison. “We continue to invest to keep our system reliable and are accelerating the integration of clean technologies onto the grid.”

He added, “We also realize that these are difficult times for our customers and have taken steps to ease the financial burden and help them stay safe. Defeating the coronavirus requires a collective effort and the women and men of Con Edison are keenly focused on doing our part.”

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On the flip side, residents in nearby Westchester, New York, can expect a decrease to their Con Edison bill. A residential home in this suburb typically uses 500-kilowatt hours per month that costs $121.31 on average, according to data from 2019. However, Con Edison said these customers can expect their bill to go down by three percent for $117.63 per month.

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