EAGLE-EYED viewers noticed a time period language blunder in the BBC drama The Pursuit of Love starring Lily James.

Fans spotted a mistake with Lily James’ character Linda’s dialogue during the second episode of the BBC drama on Sunday.

The Pursuit of Love is based on the novel by Nancy Mitford, which was first published in 1945.

Stars Lily James and Dominic West feature in the television adaptation that began last week.

Lily's character Linda Radlett was seen stranded in Gare du Nord station in Paris after being told her ticket had expired the day before.

Linda burst into tears and was approached by a laughing Frenchman who offered to rescue her and take her out for lunch.


As Linda headed to a hotel, she promised to meet the man in a few hours.

But she ended up oversleeping in her luxurious Parisian hotel room.

Frenchman called Linda and told her she has kept him waiting and mentions their "affair", she looks shocked.

Linda replied: "We are not going to have an affair if that's what you were thinking.

“I don't want lunch! I shall leave this hotel room and go straight to the train station."

But viewers were quick to point out ‘train station’ wouldn’t be the right phrase for the era, as one viewer said: “Sorry but she would never say ‘train station’ #ThePursuitOfLove.”

A second noted: “I'm sure Nancy would think it terribly terrible 'non-U'."

Another suggested that people would have said "railway station" during that era, the original tweeter replied: "Absolutely."

Written and directed by Emily Mortimer, The Pursuit of Love followed the life experience of Linda Radlett and her cousin Fanny Logan.

Set between World War I and World War II in Alconleigh (near Oxford), the storyline examined the female protagonists' attempts to find true romance while finding clarity about familiar matters. 

The Pursuit of Love takes place 100 years after the events of Bridgerton and similarly explores social dynamics in high society London.

The Pursuit of Love continues Sunday at 9pm on BBC One.

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